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Equifax Statement About Security Breaches

TempA cyberattack on credit reporter Equifax revealed personal information about 143 million people. What makes this breach worrying is the type of information that was stolen: Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, driver’s license numbers.

On the home page of its website, Equifax has a red post directing readers to a statement for more information. They are also offering identity protection for people affected.

Temp

But the company isn't making it easy. When I entered my information, I saw a message that I may be affected, and then I saw the message at right, saying, in order to enroll, I would need to revisit in 4 days for some reason. Temp

The company fixed another criticism: if you signed up for their protection, there was some question about whether you were waiving rights to sue. The company clarified: "In response to consumer inquiries, we have made it clear that the arbitration clause and class action waiver included in the Equifax and TrustedID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident."

Overall, the company is accepting responsibility. The Chairman and CEO Rick Smith explained the situation on a video.

Discussion:

  • Assess Equifax's statement. What principles of bad news are followed, and how could it be improved.
  • Now assess Rick Smith's video statement. Consider the question above as well as delivery skills.